New guidance policy set to last for following years

Students+packed+into+the+guidance+office+Monday+morning%2C+looking+for+a+chance+to+change+their+schedules.+Photo+by+Asa+Lory

Students packed into the guidance office Monday morning, looking for a chance to change their schedules. Photo by Asa Lory

Joanne Lee

The guidance staff approved the schedule change policy that went into effect this school year to take place again next year. This means that students will continue to have to wait until the third day of school to change their schedules.
Continuing this year’s policy, “was an essential thing to do because we just don’t have room for random changes,” guidance staff director Betsy Jones said.
With the new schedule change policy “there were less schedule changes and more meaningful changes,” sophomore counselor Rachel Reed said. By putting the students to experience two days of their requested schedules, they were less likely to make preemptive schedule changes, and the changes made weren’t because of reasons such as AUT in a certain time, teacher requests and such.”
With direction-less reasons weeded out of the schedule change process, counselors and students both experienced a more “quick and organized experience,” sophomore Alexa Shelton said. “It was so simple. I for sure knew I needed to change a certain class, and the entire process was very friendly. I was a little frustrated for having to wait, though, because the class I needed to change, I didn’t even sign up for.”
Although Shelton liked the process in general, like her, not everyone was pleased with the wait. Then there was also the daunting experience of having to face the teacher first, to get their signatures on the drop form, before seeing anyone about changes.
“I hated [the wait] at first but then everything worked out, and I actually think it’s a really good idea now,” senior Kat Schultz said. “There was still that humiliation of having to go up to the teacher.”
Samuel Martin and other guidance counselors described the new schedule change policy as “smoother.” “Some [students] were frustrated [because of the three-day long wait,] but for the most part students and parents understood [our motives], and I think in the long run, the changes that needed to be made were made,” senior counselor Samuel Martin said. “This prevented the few days before school from being as hectic as [they] used to be, and I had the chance to focus on students with holes in their schedule and incomplete one[s] — thus, more urgent problems. We noticed [a] positive difference this year, but we’re always open to improvement. I prefer this method.”
Martin said all staff members are striving for the new system by progressing toward the new policies and changes being made.Students are all the more fortunate to meet great new policies, let alone new teachers and friends.
During the counselor meeting on Aug. 31, “everyone was pleased with the new system,” Jones said. “We will be continuing this with one little change that we added; we will have the counselors and me, as opposed to just me, to explain for the students any questions they have for their schedules,” on schedule pick-up day.
Guidance staff changed schedule pick-up day policy so counselors and Jones would have the opportunity to conference one-on-one with students, instead of only seeing Jones.
By Joanne Lee