Classical music deserves student attention

Classical music deserves student attention

Parker Sutherland

Bows fill the air: RBHS students from the orchestra perform at the Pre-contest Concert on March 14. Photo by Madison Brown
So many artists are flashy, auto tuned monsters trudging out single after single; there’s no true quality, but an overabundance of quantity. True artistry lies within our very building in the young generation’s attempt to capture classical pieces to their fullest, the RBHS orchestra.
Classical music is not old and outdated. The music of the past makes up components that can be found in every piece in today’s generation. Movements and rules to rhythmic flow branch from the generations before our time that paved the way musically.
For people who can’t stand a classical sound, it doesn’t mean there aren’t beautiful instrumental pieces of recent. Cool, chic manor groups like Apocalyptica put classical spins on modern music and sound almost the same as the original artists.
If stringed instruments aren’t an interesting way to play music than there are other ways to enjoy classical music. New instruments are popping up everywhere like this saw piece played by Austin Blackburn.
A live orchestra concerts may be slightly expensive as the average orchestral attendee is prepared to spend $150-$200 for concerts, according to the Amati Organization, a group for the preservation of stringed instruments. In contrast the average rock concert tickets cost $46 a piece, according to ABC News. attendee spends. But there is absolutely no reason not to attend the RBHS orchestra concert because it doesn’t cost a dime to attend.
Someone working on a specific piece for months only turns out amazing. There shouldn’t be expectations that the music will be awful because the students in orchestra care about it. They aren’t going to perform a terrible piece that sounds like a four-year-old screeching it out for the first time.
People in the orchestra class spend the entirety of the year preparing for a concert, and yet almost no one comes to see them. It is not fair, or even acceptable. The next Mozart or Yo-Yo Ma could be practicing in the warm-up rooms right at this very moment. Students need to get  to the next orchestra concert or possibly miss a performance of a lifetime.
By Parker Sutherland