Students look forward to annual Capers talent show

Adam Schoelz

Senior Diego Huaman and junior Joel Pruitt perform at Capers auditions last March. Photo by Asa Lory

The acts for the 2012 Capers Talent show have been decided. Of many auditions, 17 were admitted for popular talent show, the brainchild of Richard Hadfield, band director at RBHS from 1980 to 2000.

The auditions for Capers were March 6 and 7, and these acts will perform on Thursday, April 19.

Assistant band director Bob Thalhuber, the audition judge, said the most important criterion in determining the program was variance.

“We look for variety. That’s it. I can’t have 16 metal bands and a juggler,” Thalhuber said. “If you’re original, if your act is different, then automatically your shot of getting in goes way up.”

Junior Joel Pruitt said he was excited that all three of his acts made it into Capers. He didn’t get in last year, but with his success this year he feels that Capers is going to be a great time.

“I’m pretty psyched. It turns out that one of my groups is starting the night and another one of my groups is ending the night, and I kind of play before intermission, so I get to play stuff all throughout capers,” Pruitt said. “I’m just really excited to get to be part of capers because it’s always been really awesome, and people always enjoy it, and lots of people come out.”

It’s junior David Wang’s second year performing in the talent show, and experience he said has taught him a lot. Wang dances with RBHS’s breakdance club, and said that every year groups members decide to step up the performance.

“Since it’s my second year, my group is preparing a little more, and for all the other guys in that group, at least most of them, I think it’s their third year,” Wang said. “And with each year that we do Capers, we realize we need to prepare more and more for it to look better onstage.”

Thalhuber said that Capers is not only for the students; it’s an important source of income for the band. The band uses the money for repairs, purchase of instruments and preparation for next year’s field show.

“It gets us through pretty much now, like February, March—right now we’re broke,” Thalhuber said. “By the summer we have to be able to pay for our field show for next year.”

By Adam Schoelz