Kindness helps humans change

Abbie Powers

With hair damp from rain and spirits trampled by life, the sincere concern of a friend caring for my well-being, three words, “how are you?” left me with a refreshing sense of hope and warmth.

The words were nothing spectacular; in fact, they’re often said. But the attitude they rang with and the kindness of a friend were enough to make me realize that a person’s character can make things happen.

While high school threatened to swallow me whole in homework, stress and unexpected disappointment, the nice words of a friend helped me see the good and light of life again.

Over the years, the days I see the effects of kindness first-hand are the moments that have revealed to me the value of being kind. Kindness revealed itself to be more than just an action, just something people were expected to have.

Being nice transformed itself into a valuable piece of potential, one with the strength to draw happiness.

People are the only ones with the power to evoke change. This power is easy and disposable. They can ruin a day or make a day. Break a heart or build a future. Ruin self-esteem with one sour remark or set someone’s confidence on fire for days.

People are the only creatures on earth who hold the power to knowingly affect an outcome.

Why then, does it seem, we are not taking our roles as “people” seriously enough?

They who bring us both joy and pain are the key to transforming oneself from an ambiguous figure sketched on life’s face to something deserving of self-fulfillment.

People enjoy and relate to others who are considerate and understanding. Be a person who others want to be with.

People are meant to have a fair chance to carry out their personal goals, dreams, to love what’s attainable, to be a person who helps. People care.

The world consists of roughly 6,995,884,902 people as of now, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. About 313,059,085 of these people live in America, a place where the simple lives we have should be forced to reveal themselves as the opportunity they are.

Each person in this country, every single one, holds an amazing power and potential; each one is unique.

On Saturdays when I get up early to help with a team of Special Olympics bowlers, I force myself to think of this personal purpose and all it does.

Of course it would be lovely to get more sleep and seclude myself from the rest of the world on a Saturday morning, but the satisfaction that comes from seeing a group of less-abled people’s joy overrides my own selfish wishes.

My small act of service is a tiny contribution to an organization that makes it possible for these bowlers to look forward to and immensely enjoy each and every Saturday morning.

It may be difficult, confusing, scary to sort through this power once one realizes it’s there, but the goals and values found beneath the weight of decisions put worth into lives.

Life gives people what they need to become who they are. As I age, I hope not to let down the strengths life has graced me with. I can only hope and try my best to do them justice.

I intend to use the power I have to the world’s greatest advantage.

This is one of the only times a person has the ability to be in complete control of life.

Actions, words, thoughts, emotions — people are who they choose to be. You are who you choose to be.

This enlightening realization has given me the spark I need, a spark everyone needs, to push forward and to live with a happy, satisfying purpose.

So you fulfill whatever you choose. Everyone has the potential to be a kind person. To be a person who will make life better for others. To be a person who makes happiness.
By Abbie Powers
This is labeled as opinion on the desktop version.