Snow impedes morning commute

Snow impedes morning commute

Jessica Jost

Struggling to reach school: Many students were late to school after an early morning snowfall Tuesday Dec. 6. Photo by Muhammad Al-Rawi

Snow sometimes means no school and sleeping in, but today, for students like senior Kira Lubahn, snow meant trouble.

“I was driving to go pick up my friend [senior] Elsa [Neal]; we carpool everday,” Lubahn said.  “I turned onto Chapel Hill and tried to make it down the hill. My car went all over the road and [I] pulled into a suburban area and called Elsa. Elsa’s mom came to pick me up because she had a van.”
Neal was surprised her Ford was needed to come to Lubahn’s rescue.
“When Kira called and said she got stuck, I was like, ‘No!’” Neal said. “She was stuck at the bottom of the hill, so we didn’t even bother going down the hill because so many people were sliding around so I walked down to get Kira.”

The trouble continued as Lubahn and Neal continued their journey to RBHS.
“We went onto Scott, and we were stuck there for 30-40 minutes,” Lubahn said. “We saw a pedestrian walking in slippers and she was moving faster than us.”
Lubahn and Neal weren’t the only ones with driving difficulties. At 9:29 a.m. Boone County Sherrif’s Department reported 34 accidents being investigated. Though senior Katie Hobbs did not have a wreck, she had trouble getting to school.
“There was a lot of ice packed snow on the road and it was hard to turn out of my neighborhood [intersection of Forum Blvd and Woodrail Ave.],” Hobbs said. “It’s a bad turn on normal days and because of the snow, people would turn and stop moving and their wheels would be moving but they would be stopped. That happened to a few people in front of me.”
In addition to trouble driving, students said KOMU  reported  Columbia Public Schools were closed for the day, which led to confusion. Still, enough students came to school and for teachers and administrators, it was business as usual.
“Our staff and students have done an amazing job [dealing with the snow],” principal Mark Maus said. “All our students able to come to school came and our staff members have come to ensure that they were taken care of. If the students were in class they were being taught.”
As of 11 a.m. 490 students have been either tardy or absent today. The number does not reflect the exact cause of the absence; a more conclusive report will be available at 3 p.m. today.

By Jessica Jost

[nggallery id=25]