Students, faculty look eastward at Hurricane Sandy

The perfect storm: Waves start to crash against New Jersey as Hurricane Sandy approaches on Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012. Photo used with permission from Associated Press

The perfect storm: Waves start to crash against New Jersey as Hurricane Sandy approaches on Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012. Photo used with permission from Associated Press

Maddie Magruder

Waves start to crash against New Jersey as Hurricane Sandy, now a non-tropical storm, approaches on Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012. Photo used with permission from Associated Press
Updated as of 11:53 p.m., Oct. 29:
Sandy has been reclassified as a non-tropical storm because of unusual interactions and dynamics the storm had with Arctic winds. Although the storm has lost characteristics that mark it as a tropical storm, Sandy is now larger and more dangerous.
As Sandy makes its way to the East Coast of the United States, the entire country prepares for the storm.
Though the storm is slated for half a country away, RBHS students and faculty are keeping a wary eye on its movements and the preparations of the residents of the nearly 12 states that Hurricane Sandy will affect.
The storm, previously a Category 1 hurricane according to weather.com, will not only bring huge storm surges, a rising of the sea as a result of atmospheric pressure changes and wind, but also destructive winds and accompanying freezing temperatures.
English teacher Debbie McDonough, who used to live in Boston, Mass., said she has close friends who still live in Boston. McDonough said one of her friends has battened down and picked up branches to avoid their possibly becoming projectiles and stocked up on candle, gas and cash.
Her friends in Boston “are used to it,” McDonough said. “It’s not something that they are surprised by.”
While McDonough’s friends are accustomed to the threat of a hurricane, Hurricane Sandy particularly worries those who have never experienced such a storm firsthand. For instance, junior Ross Park is particularly concerned because his brother, who lives in Washington D.C., will be facing the tempest.
“We’ve always lived in Missouri,” Parks said, “so this is his first hurricane. I hope he’s OK, and I hope he has somewhere safe to be.”
The threat of a hurricane can be scary, sometimes even life-threatening, but McDonough said even though she’s worried for her friends, she’s sure everything will be all right.
“You never know what direction a storm could take,” McDonough said. “Do they lose electricity and for how long?… and basements get flooded and roads get flooded. You can’t go anywhere, so yeah, I always worry about them, but I’m sure they’ll be fine.”
By Maddie Magruder
additional reporting by Atreyo Ghosh
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