Invisible children screens movie in planetarium

Invisible Children heads to Columbia to spread the word at RBHS. Photo by Trisha Chaudhery

Invisible Children heads to Columbia to spread the word at RBHS. Photo by Trisha Chaudhery

Trisha Chaudhary

Invisible Children heads to Columbia to spread the word at RBHS. Photo by Trisha Chaudhary
Three Invisible Children workers and one representative from Uganda traveled from San Diego, Calif. to  present in Columbia. While here, they screened the film not only at RBHS, but also at University of Missouri-Columbia.
The approximately 45-minute movie showcased the start of the Invisible Children organization as well as the growing movement to put an end to violence created by the LRA (Lord’s Resistance Army) in northern Uganda and now, southern Darfur. The movie included footage of the LRA’s camp within the heart of the Congo as well as attempted peace negotiations with US and African officials and Joseph Kony, the leader of the LRA.
After the movie ended, the representative from Uganda, Jafri, spoke to the audience about his personal experiences with the LRA. Born in the heart of the conflict, Jafri was abducted by the LRA at the age of 16 while walking home from school. Rebel forces in the Congo held him captive for two months until he escaped by accidentally treading onto Ugandan military territory.
In addition to sharing his story, Jafri and the Invisible Children representatives took questions from the audience and also had a booth set up in the main commons with informational fliers and pamphlets.
Stephanie LeBlanc, a sophomore in second hour AP World Studies who attended the screening, was shocked to see the impact that the LRA is having in northern Uganda and southern Darfur.
“I was just blown away at how many children were killed and abducted and how many families were affected,” Stephanie said. And “how much the US can do and what they’re not doing, what we should be doing.”
The East African Coalition, a club started at RBHS earlier this month by juniors Anna Wright, Ashleigh Atasoy, Trisha Chaudhary, Sarah Poor, Sam Ryan, Urmila Kutikkad and senior Jacqueline LeBlanc, hosted the screening. World Studies teacher, Katherine Sasser, who traveled to Uganda previously as part of a teacher exchange program, sponsors the club.
The movie was shown second and third hour and the Invisible Children group also did a small workshop with Sasser and David Graham’s fourth hour on point world history class. The classes that attended the screenings were mostly world studies classes as well as a few other students who joined in to watch.
Stephanie LeBlanc, as well as several other students, signed up to receive more information and/or join the East Africa Coalition in order to help the war that is still raging in the villages of East Africa.
By Trisha Chaudhary
Did you see the film? What struck you about it? We would love to hear your comments.