Rejection

Rejection

Alyssa Piecko

In January, The ROCK staff looked at the multiple facets of rejection in high school life.
After turning in more than a dozen applications to various businesses around Columbia, junior Phoebe Johanningmeier was excited to hear back from her prospective employers — after all, a traditional rite of passage for teenagers is a first job. When no one replied after some time, Johanningmeier said the rejection was a tough pill to swallow.
“I applied for 13 jobs. I didn’t get a call back. I didn’t get anything,” Johanningmeier said. “It’s kind of like, ‘Wow, 13 times I’ve tried,’ and it feels like you’re like a failure. You’ve tried 13 times to get a minimum paying job, and no one wants you. It’s kind of depressing.”
Getting a job in high school is becoming more of a struggle. Businesses aren’t allowing as many students into the workforce because of their lack of experience and limited availability. For high school students, many of whom are applying for their first job, the chances of employment are at a low 16 percent, compared to the 32 percent of high school students with jobs in 1990, according to an article in the Washington Times.
Junior Marissa Soumokil said the reason jobs for high school students are scarce is because they are the alternative choice…
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