15 Days of Torment: Foreword, Day 1 Mean Girls

Image used under the fair use doctrine.

Image used under the fair use doctrine.

Jude El Buri

Image used under the fair use doctrine.
Foreword:
When I first heard of the 15 chick flicks in 15 days, I readily accepted the challenge, pleased to have an excuse to watch a movie every single day for two weeks. I was excited to dive into my first week of chick flicks since some of my favorite movies were chick flicks.
I excitedly hopped onto the Internet and googled the top 100 chick flicks. I made a list of all the movies that sounded funny, romantic, even some that sounded somewhat questionable.
With my chick flick research completed and my movies picked out, I was ready to begin…
Day One:
It was my first day — Monday. I had hours of arduous homework to look forward to and probably another sleepless night. But I was going to enjoy this next 97 minutes and forget about all of that for the moment. With a bowl of my mom’s bland, tasteless popcorn in my lap, I plopped onto the couch and began my adventure.
I decided to start with a classic flick that never ceases to fascinate me despite the numerous times I’ve watched it. Mean Girls. The hilarity of the movie did indeed crack me up, but the movie was also able to move me to tears within the same five minutes. It wasn’t all that sad, per se, but it had its moments.
The movie revolved around the battle against the “Plastics” or the mean girls. It followed how hurtful comments and backbiting progressively changed the girls’ lives. Now every time I think of that movie, I hear Gretchen’s (played by Lacey Chabert) voice saying “I’m sorry that people are so jealous of me, but I can’t help it that I’m popular.” After the movie, I even went on to watching the deleted scenes and
It ultimately ended with an admittedly stale, but positive message; Materialism isn’t everything, and girls should support each other through hardships instead of tear each other down. It also emphasized the importance of diversity and the acceptance of different people. Even though the message wasn’t all that original, the comedic element of the movie was more than enough compensation.
By Jude El Buri