‘Godzilla’ dissapoints the years of anticipation

Image used under fair use doctrine Source: www.godzilla-movies.com

Image used under fair use doctrine Source: www.godzilla-movies.com

Ronel Ghidey

 

Image used under fair use doctrine Source: www.godzilla-movies.com
Image used under fair use doctrine Source: www.godzilla-movies.com
In the continuance of the multi-decade long series, Godzilla definitely did not live up to all of the hype that came with the commercials.
In this new adaption that’s directed by Gareth Edwards, who also directed the smash hit, Monsters, it revolves around a boy named Ford Brody,who is played by Aaron Taylor-Johnson, the scrawny boy from Kick-Ass,and his family who lived in Japan in 1999, where his parents worked in at a nuclear plant based near Tokyo. One day, when Tokyo suffers a severe ‘earthquake’, the nuclear plant becomes destroyed and his mother dies in the process.
Then the movie travels to the present day, and Ford has grown to become an explosive ordinance disposal technician for the US navy, and now lives with his wife and son in San Francisco.
When Joe, Ford’s father whose grown quite the obsession with the earthquake that killed his wife, gets arrested for trespassing near the nuclear plant his she died, Ford travels back to Japan to bail out his father, and after bonding after loss time and re-visiting the plant together, they both realize that the ‘earthquake’ that caused the death of their wife/mom, was something else altogether; a living creature who was hibernating while absorbing the nuclear radiation for energy (surprised, right?).
As the creature starts to run wild, the one and only awakes from its eternal slumber to stop it: Godzilla. In this most recent adaptation of Japan’s most infamous monster, they show Godzilla as the ‘savior’ of mankind, and were, quite frankly, a very predictable throughout the film. Anything and everything that you would predict to happen, like maybe a character dying in the most conspicuous way humanly possible, or a main character just happening to be in the most beneficial place at the right time (I mean, I get that the main character shouldn’t die, but c’mon, there’s a limit) the whole movie seemed like a cliché.
Even though I had a lot anticipation for this movie, because like most of America, I’m a fan of the predecessors to this movie, I was disappointed in many ways and honestly believe that the movie wasn’t even worth the $7.25 I paid to watch it.
Ronel Ghidey