Zach Carroll lives life through basketball

Freshman Zach Carroll sets up the offense against Lee Summit West. The Bruin junior varsity won the game 49-41. Photo by Parker Sutherland

Freshman Zach Carroll sets up the offense against Lee Summit West. The Bruin junior varsity won the game 49-41. Photo by Parker Sutherland

Maddie Davis

Freshman Zach Carroll sets up the offense against Lee Summit West. The Bruin junior varsity won the game 49-41. Photo by Parker Sutherland
When sophomore Zach Carroll started first grade, he also began his career as a basketball player. Because of his father’s influence, Carroll has played for many competition teams, recreational teams and now for RBHS’s junior varsity basketball team.
“My dad got me started playing,” Carroll said. “He used to be my coach when I was younger. He taught me how to do all of the things that I do, and he’s a really great role model because he played [basketball] all through high school.”
Following in his dad’s footsteps, Carroll believes his biggest contribution to the team is shooting. His teammates look to him not only a shooting guard, but also a leader.
“We can always count on him to hit open jump shots,” freshman Alex Ofodile said. “He always has a positive attitude, and you can tell he loves the game because he gives 100 percent every time he is on the court.”
Carroll’s efforts have helped the boys to a record of 10-1.
“The hardest game so far has been against Rockhurst,” Carroll said. “They were a lot older and bigger than us. We didn’t play as a team, and it seemed like our team had no motivation. It was by far our weakest performance.”
Despite the one off-game, Carroll enjoys playing for the Bruins against competitive teams.
“I like the coaches more,” Carroll said. “I play with my friends, and we get so much fan support.”
Because of the good fan base, Carroll’s favorite game has been against Hickman. The combination of winning and involving the crowd drives Carroll to play at a faster, more intense pace.
The Hickman game “was sold out and got really crazy,” Carroll said. “With everyone cheering it makes us want to play harder and, most of the time, play better.”
By Maddie Davis